Is it possible to maximize a team’s potential?

Statistics show that 89% of employees are demotivated by ineffective managers and leaders and 100% of the leaders in this country are demotivated by disengaged, disruptive and ungrateful employees.

One thing is certain: improvement stops when people BELIEVE they’ve reached their level of “acceptable” performance.

The greatest ability of every manager/leader is the ability to develop abilities in others.

THE MILLION DOLLAR QUESTION IS – HOW MIGHT LEADERS BRING OUT THE BEST IN THEIR TEAM – NOT JUST THE TOP PERFORMERS BUT THOSE NON PERFORMERS WHO ARE CONSTANTLY CAUSING HEADACHES ON A DAILY BASIS?

Solution: You can improve your performance and the performance of your team based on how you spend your time and where you put your energy and focus. When you look at people and try to understand what motivates them to perform at their best – you will be better able to match high motivation to organizational need and will increase performance.

When employees are engaged in work that allows them to use their motivated abilities, they not only have a greater chance to be more productive and successful but they have a greater chance to feel satisfied and good about what they are doing.

So as we assess the team you might see that one person focuses on detail while another is more conceptual; some are team oriented and others loners; some are talkers…others writers; some good with numbers and others good with people and there are those who are good at organizing things.

Rather than train them to be different we can leverage the differences and use them to improve productivity and performance.

ONE OF THE MOST COMMON WORKPLACE COMPLAINTS IS THAT BOSSES DON’T DEAL WITH POOR PERFORMERS.

In a recent Harvard Business Review article Nigel Richardson – Professor of Organizational Behaviour said:

Typically, successive bosses leave a problem person alone, shying away from the mixture of cost and futility they anticipate would come from any attempt to improve matters. So when the employee perks up and starts acting more reasonably, the outward ripples are palpable.

But it’s not just that people now find it easier working with someone who once was a problem. Your efforts also send a strong message. When people want a boss to “deal with” a poor performer, that doesn’t always mean outright dismissal. In your efforts to turn someone around—even if you ultimately fail and the person quits—people will see the mark of a manager and a culture that prefers problem solving to waste disposal. Summarily getting rid of someone, on the other hand, signals that the organization discards rather than deals with difficult people—and who knows who might be next?

If you have a challenging group within your organization or a challenging individual on your team then we need to talk!  For a no obligation chat about your situation, fill out the form below.

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How I Serve

Money makes the world go ’round!

This quotation was first used in a musical play ‘ Cabaret’, a 1960’s melancholy play. In one of the songs, the female lead expresses her wish for love and the male protagonist replies with this line in the song, implying that MONEY makes the world turn…not LOVE.

We spend our lives collecting, spending, lusting after, and worrying about money — in fact, when we say we “don’t have time” to learn something new, it’s usually because we are feverishly devoting our time to earning money… Michael Simmons – bestselling author and Learning How to Learn Speaker and Teacher

But something is happening right now that’s changing what we know about how to earn more money.

Knowledge is the new money, but not just any knowledge:

self-knowledge.

In order to be self-reliant, we must have this knowledge and learn how to convert that knowledge into money and results.

At Purple Marketing I teach people how to be self-reliant by providing the guidance, ideas, framework and tools [what I call the G.I.F.Tof Possibility] – to facilitate personal, sales and marketing performance insight – the knowledge that when leveraged provides the foundation for understanding what each person needs to do, to get the results they seek.

Is it possible to maximize a team’s potential?

Statistics show that 89% of employees are demotivated by ineffective managers and leaders and 100% of the leaders in this country are demotivated by disengaged, disruptive and ungrateful employees.

One thing is certain: improvement stops when people BELIEVE they’ve reached their level of “acceptable” performance.

The greatest ability of every manager/leader is the ability to develop abilities in others.

THE MILLION DOLLAR QUESTION IS – HOW MIGHT LEADERS BRING OUT THE BEST IN THEIR TEAM – NOT JUST THE TOP PERFORMERS BUT THOSE NON PERFORMERS WHO ARE CONSTANTLY CAUSING HEADACHES ON A DAILY BASIS?

Solution: You can improve your performance and the performance of your team based on how you spend your time and where you put your energy and focus. When you look at people and try to understand what motivates them to perform at their best – you will be better able to match high motivation to organizational need and will increase performance.

When employees are engaged in work that allows them to use their motivated abilities, they not only have a greater chance to be more productive and successful but they have a greater chance to feel satisfied and good about what they are doing.

So as we assess the team you might see that one person focuses on detail while another is more conceptual; some are team oriented and others loners; some are talkers…others writers; some good with numbers and others good with people and there are those who are good at organizing things.

Rather than train them to be different we can leverage the differences and use them to improve productivity and performance.

ONE OF THE MOST COMMON WORKPLACE COMPLAINTS IS THAT BOSSES DON’T DEAL WITH POOR PERFORMERS.

In a recent Harvard Business Review article Nigel Richardson – Professor of Organizational Behaviour said:

Typically, successive bosses leave a problem person alone, shying away from the mixture of cost and futility they anticipate would come from any attempt to improve matters. So when the employee perks up and starts acting more reasonably, the outward ripples are palpable.

But it’s not just that people now find it easier working with someone who once was a problem. Your efforts also send a strong message. When people want a boss to “deal with” a poor performer, that doesn’t always mean outright dismissal. In your efforts to turn someone around—even if you ultimately fail and the person quits—people will see the mark of a manager and a culture that prefers problem solving to waste disposal. Summarily getting rid of someone, on the other hand, signals that the organization discards rather than deals with difficult people—and who knows who might be next?

If you have a challenging group within your organization or a challenging individual on your team then we need to talk!  For a no obligation chat about your situation, fill out the form below.

Dragonfly thoughts…

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